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Home > All articles > ECONOLINE CRUSH > Econoline Crush [reviews]
Econoline Crush [reviews]
The Devil You Know |EMI, 1997|

1. Surefire (Never Enough), 2. Sparkle and Shine, 3. Deeper, 4. Hollowman, 5. Home, 6. The Devil You Know, 7. All That You Are (X3), 8. Burnt, 9. Haven't Gone Away, 10. Elegant, 11. Razorblades and Bandaides


After being bashed and hailed for being textbook industrial rock, Canada's own Econoline Crush reappears with their second album, The Devil You Know. The sophomore effort isn't textbook, but it does provide an experiment vibe.

Throughout the album, you'll notice electronic elements within the songs. More electronic beeps, scratches, and other good stuff. The electronic rock style is very dominant within the album, but the toll is taken when it comes to the heaviness. Unlike Affliction (the band's first album), the angry guitar riffs simply make cameos. Instead, the guitars are blended in to fit vocalist Trevor Hurst's melodic vocal style more reasonably. "Home", the lead single off the album, proves that point. Even though guitar riffs pop up now and then throughout the song (like I said before, cameo appearances), the instrument is more fitted in harmony to Hurst's vocals. At times, this is good, such as "Home." But other times, it seems that songs are lacking the noticeable guitar riff.

It's also noticeable that Econoline Crush has taken a more pop rock approach to some of their songs. "All That You Are (X3)" is melodic and it's simply a good song. The band recreates what made late 1990s rock so popular: Being "catchy."

Other songs such as "Deeper" and "Hollowman" shows the industrial side of Econoline Crush that makes their songs, at times, eerie. "Deeper" in particular has an eerie vibe the entire time, thanks to the keyboard lead.

Overall, The Devil You Know combines industrial rock and pop rock quite well. Even though the heavy style that the band was originally known for isn't dominant this time around, it doesn't seem to matter. The album is worth picking up. (Xenerki)

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